As the summer continues to fly by, we’re back here for another edition of The SubModern Report. After sharing the top spot on the singles chart last week, Wild Nothing goes it alone this week with "Letting Go." And we have a brand new #1 on album chart, Fight The Good Fight from The Interrupters. Congrats to both chart toppers this week.

The Joy Formidable ticks up to #2 on the singles chart with their new one, "The Wrong Side," followed by a former #1, interpol‘s "The Rover" at #3. In a tie for #4 are "Crush" from Cigarettes After Sex and "Hi Hello" from Johnny Marr‘s Call The Comet, which is the #2 album as well. Portugal. The Man are still chugging along with another single from last year’s Woodstock as "Tidal Wave" makes landfall at #6. Oscar is down three to #7 with "1UP" and then the top ten closes with a three-way tie between Matt and Kim‘s new remix of "Glad I Tried," a brand new single from Metric (YAY!) called "Dark Saturday," and "James Dean" from The Wrecks.

On the album chart at #3 is a very early debut from Twenty One Pilots of their forthcoming album Trench, which is due out in October and they released two songs from last week. Oh how excited their Skeleton Clique must be. Dirty Projectors‘ just released Lamp Lit Prose is in at #4. There’s a tie at #5 between The Now Now from Gorillaz and Critical Hit from Yukon Blonde. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever‘s Hope Downs is at #7, followed by Bodega‘s Endless Scroll at #8. Then a seven-way tie at #9 is among the biggest I’ve ever seen and that’s far too many albums to type out here so I’ll let you check that out, along with much more, on the charts below.

Finally, I want to give you a head’s up that we’ll have a new show joining our ranks in a few weeks, Indies Only from WQRR in Tuscaloosa, AL, hosted by Monk. You can welcome him and start sending music ahead of his August 4th premiere date at monk@alt1017.com.

~ Josh Landow
Twitter: @JoshTLandow
 

Updated 7/18/18

#ArtistTrackLabel
1WILD NOTHINGLETTING GOCAPTURED TRACKS
2THE JOY FORMIDABLETHE WRONG SIDESERADOM
3INTERPOLTHE ROVERMATADOR
4tCIGARETTES AFTER SEXCRUSHPARTISAN
 JOHNNY MARRHI HELLONEW VOODOO
6PORTUGAL. THE MANTIDAL WAVEATLANTIC
7OSCAR1UPWICHITA
8tMATT AND KIMGLAD I TRIEDFADER
 METRICDARK SATURDAYBMG RIGHTS
 THE WRECKSJAMES DEANRED
11tTHE INTERRUPTERSSHE’S KEROSENEHELLCAT
 JAMESCOMING HOME, PT. 2INFECTIOUS / BMG
 MUDHONEYPARANOID CORESUB POP
 YUKON BLONDESUMMER IN JULYDINE ALONE
15tDEATH CAB FOR CUTIEGOLD RUSHATLANTIC
 DILLY DALLYI FEEL FREEPARTISAN
 RUBBLEBUCKETLEMONADEGRAND JURY
 TASH SULTANASALVATIONMOM + POP
 TWENTY ONE PILOTSNICO AND THE NINERSFUELED BY RAMEN
 TWENTY ONE PILOTSJUMPSUITFUELED BY RAMEN
 YOUNG & SICKOJAIB3SCI
22tALBERT HAMMOND JR.FAR AWAY TRUTHSRED BULL
 BOB MOSESHEAVEN ONLY KNOWSDOMINO
 BOY PABLOSICK FEELINGU OK? /777
 GORILLAZHUMILITYWARNER BROS.
 MR TWIN SISTERJAIPURINFINITE BEAST
 SONTALKI AM A WAR MACHINESONY MASTERWORKS
 TOKYO POLICE CLUBHERCULESDINE ALONE
 WHITE DENIMIT MIGHT GET DARKCITY SLANG

 

Updated 7/18/18

#ArtistAlbumLabel
1THE INTERRUPTERSFIGHT THE GOOD FIGHTHELLCAT
2JOHNNY MARRCALL THE COMETNEW VOODOO
3TWENTY ONE PILOTSTRENCHFUELED BY RAMEN
4DIRTY PROJECTORSLAMP LIT PROSEDOMINO
5tGORILLAZTHE NOW NOWWARNER BROS.
 YUKON BLONDECRITICAL HITDINE ALONE
7ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVERHOPE DOWNSSUB POP
8BODEGAENDLESS SCROLLWHAT’S YOUR RUPTURE?
9tJIM JAMESUNIFORM DISTORTIONATO
 MIKAELA DAVISDELIVERYROUNDER
 MONASOLDIER ONBRIGHT ANTENNA
 RUBBLEBUCKETSUN MACHINEGRAND JURY
 UMEOTHER NATUREMODERN OUTSIDER
 VALLEY QUEENSUPERGIANTROLL CALL
 YUNOMOODIESUB POP
16tBEACH HOUSE7SUB POP
 DENTISTNIGHT SWIMMINGCLEOPATRA
 THE RUBENSLO LA RUSELF-RELEASED
 SHADOWPARTYSHADOWPARTYMUTE
 SLOTHRUSTTHE PACTDANGERBIRD
 TOKYO POLICE CLUBTPCDINE ALONE
22tTHE ALARMEQUALSTWENTY FIRST CENTURY
 GOONDUSK OF PUNK / HAPPY OMENPARTISAN
 LOVELYTHEBANDFINDING IT HARD TO SMILERED
 SNAIL MAILLUSHMATADOR
 SWERVEDUMB ROMEOSELF-RELEASED

 

SubModern Session: The Sherlocks

The Sherlocks
Live For The Moment
(BMG)

Last year we started hearing about a band out of Arctic Monkeys‘ hometown of Sheffield in The UK. That band was The Sherlocks, who released their debut full length album, Live For The Moment, in August of 2017. After specialty hosts took a little time to get to knowThe Sherlocks, they scored a pretty big SubModern hit with "Will You Be There?" which hit #1 on our chart back in April, shortly before I had the opportunity to have them in for a SubModern Session. You can hear their acoustic performance here and read my interview with frontman Kiaran Crook below.
 
FMQB:  First of all, if you want to introduce the rest of the band members, who we’ll be hearing play some acoustic tunes with you.
 
Kiaran Crook:  Well, I’m Kiaran, I sing. We’ve got Josh, who’s the lead guitarist. Andy, his brother is the bassist. And my brother Brandon, who’s the drummer.

FMQB:  So this is a family thing, but how did the band get started, aside from the obvious; you all lived in the same house? Well, the two of you and the two of them.

KC:  I wish I could think of a better story, cause it’s pretty boring. Basically Josh and Andy moved into the same village as where me and Brandon live. It’s one of them places where everybody knows each other so if somebody new moves into that village, you know about it straight away. We just sorta bumped into Andy one day and we just started, we call it knocking about, like hanging around. Just became mates. We didn’t even know about Josh cause he was locked away in his bedroom, probably learning a chord or something.

FMQB:  Were the rest of you playing music yet?

KC:  I started playing guitar on me mom’s guitar and I wanted an electric guitar. Me dad said, "if you want an electric guitar, you need to get lessons." So I eventually got this guitar and Brandon got a drum kit, and we used to mess around with our instruments and make a lot of noise to be honest. We weren’t very good. We’re still not, but we were worse then. With time we met Josh through Andy. It took a while. So it was just me, Brandon, and Josh in our conservatory, just making noise really. I can’t recall a time when we said, "Do you want to be in a band?" We just found ourselves spending loads of time playing together. It took some time to even realize we needed a bass guitar. Andy weren’t doing anything else so we were like, "get on that bass. Learn it"

FMQB:  So this was all when you were back in school, you were kids. How long ago was this, cause you’re all still pretty young guys?

KC: Eight years ago.

FMQB:  When did it get serious?

KC:  I don’t think it ever got serious to be honest.

FMQB:  It’s serious when you’re on the charts in The UK.

KC:  It got serious in terms of like not drinking as much at shows (I’m making it sound like we’re alcoholics). And from my side, the songwriter, knuckling down and trying to write the best songs. Just little things like that, but we never take ourselves too seriously. We spent the first three years doing covers in working men’s clubs and pubs. I suppose it turned serious when we stopped doing that, just cause we all got fed up playing other people’s songs and we wanted to do our own. You could say that were the turning point.

FMQB:  How have your songs evolved from those early ones?

KC:  There weren’t a songwriter for a start. It was just everyone mucking in, trying to make something. I can even remember at one bit, me, Josh, and Andy were all just singing at the same time, just shouting really.
 
FMQB:  So from that point, things really solidified?

KC: Yeah, I think with time and once we started playing a bit more, I just must’ve just wrote a song one day and the rest of the boys must’ve thought, "It’s not too bad. It’s better than what we’ve got." So, I just became the songwriter. I never said, "I’m gonna be the songwriter," like if anyone else wants to be the songwriter, they’re more than welcome to.

FMQB:  So now that you have Live For The Moment, your full length debut out, how’s it different going out there with a body of work like that?
 
KC: An album gives you a chance to show what you’re about. Some bands tend to write the same sort of song twelve times or whatever, so every single song on the album sounds the same, but I think our album is pretty different to that in the respect that there’s a few different kinds of songs. You could even argue, the second half, we see it as like a proper record, where you flip it over still. And to me, the second half of the record sounds different to the first. The first is tunes like "Escapade" and "Last Night" and stuff like that which is dancey. And the second half is songs like "Candlelight" and "Turn The Clock," which are more emotional or whatever. Having an album definitely gives people a chance to take in what we’re about, rather than just singles. You might need to listen to the album as a whole a few times to really get it.

FMQB:  You’re from the Sheffield area, which is where Arctic Monkeys also came up. A lot of people make that comparison. Do you think it’s mainly because they’re from the same area?
 
KC: Yeah, I think it’s just lazy journalism. I don’t mean to sound as if I’m offended, because I’m actually not. Comparing us to a band like Arctic Monkeys, I’m actually quite happy about because if we could be half as big as what they are, I’d be pretty happy. So I am actually glad in that sense, but as far as musically, I honestly don’t think we sound anything like them. I mean, I’m biased.

FMQB:  You recently got to tour with Liam Gallagher. What do you take away from an experience like that and from a guy like him in terms of your own career?
 
KC: You’ve sorta gotta play the game a little bit in the industry, but I think the main thing you get from Liam is, he just don’t care, does he?  He’s almost like the bad boy at school. He’s like a bit of a rebel. I quite like that. I just find it funny. He just doesn’t take no nonsense and you’ve gotta admire him for that. You’ve gotta compromise on everything to make your band work, obviously. But at the same time I think it’s it’s good to take a bit of what Liam carries and just remember where you came from and who you are, and all that sorta stuff.

FMQB:  Are you already starting to work on some ideas for album #2?
 
MB: Yeah definitely. You could argue that we started the second album at the same time as the first. I wrote a load of songs which didn’t sound like they’d fit on this debut album, so we just put them to the side and put them in the vault and locked it. They’re good songs, but they weren’t right for what we were trying to achieve on the first album. So them songs will be coming back out, plus loads of other new songs I’ve already wrote. And I’m always writing on the road anyway. Even when I ain’t got a guitar in me hands, I’m still just chugging away… in me mind.

Find out more about The Sherlocks at TheSherlocks.co.uk.  Listen to their SubModern Session performances of "Escapade," "Motions," and "Blue" from Live For The Moment here.

By Josh T. Landow

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

IN THE RING WITH KATE NASH

By Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio
 
British singer-songwriter Kate Nash made a splash back in 2007 with her debut album Made of Bricks, showcasing her sharp songwriting and witty lyrics. Since then, her sound has expanded and gotten more eclectic over the course of the past decade. The past year has seen her profile skyrocket, as she used Kickstarter to fund the release of her fourth album Yesterday Was Forever while also co-starring on the smash Netflix series GLOW. Recently, Kate sat down with Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio of FMQB to discuss her new record, feminism, mental health and pro wrestling.

 

How was your experience of working with Kickstarter?
I feel like it still is the experience because it’s still figuring it out as you go along. It was nerve-wracking doing the Kickstarter. I didn’t want to do it at first because I thought it might fail and I was nervous the entire time. But I was also pretty excited. The more time went on, I realized it made more sense for me to be doing that. I had terrible meetings with record labels that made me feel like crap.

You already had three albums out through bigger labels and that helped you build enough of a fan base that when you go off on your own with something like Kickstarter, they’ll follow you.
It was so stressful. You have to brace yourself for failure or you have to change how you measure success. It’s really easy to feel like “I’m falling because everything’s hard” or “Should it be easier? Should I keep going because it’s so hard?” But actually, we’re having amazing experiences on tour that are a constant reminder.

I met a girl the other night who was crying through “Nicest Thing,” so much so that Emma in my band wanted to run down and hug her during the show. We met her afterward and she said her and her sister had listened to my music together and they’d always talked about going to a show. Her sister died, and that was her sister’s favorite song. And she was from Alaska and we were in Denver, and her grandparents lived in Denver, so she decided it was a sign and came to the show on her own. That is so amazing and that’s how I want to measure success – just having a connection with people through music.

You can’t take it for granted. It’s easy to get caught up in that fast-paced lifestyle and what boxes you need to tick, but I’ll remember that for the rest of my life. When I look back on Made of Bricks and being on the charts and played on the radio, that’s not something I look back on and think, “Oh it was so moving being played on Radio 1, wow.” It was fine but I wasn’t happy then and I’m happier now as an artist and I still get to have these amazing, emotional moments with fans.

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