Anyone around to read this? Am I the only one not seeing tons of bands in the warmth of the Austin sun? Yeah, I’m bummed that it didn’t work out for me to make it to SXSW this year, but I hope everyone enjoys and makes some great new musical discoveries to report back to us all in the coming weeks. I’ll try to keep things brief here for those of you reading while walking down Red River (see, I could’ve said 6th Street, but that’d be cliche and those of us who are SX pros avoid 6th at all costs).

Down to business… It was a big week for the emo-kids (and emo-adults) as The Get Up Kids announced their first album in eight years. The first single from that album, "Satellite," had a huge debut at #1, slightly overshadowing two other major debuts – The National‘s "You Had Your Soul With You" (#2) and The Black Keys‘ "Lo/Hi" (#3). Last week’s #1 from Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, "In The Capital," was down to #4, followed by Meg Myers‘ cover of Kate Bush‘s "Running Up That Hill" at #5 and Hatchie‘s "Without A Blush" at #6. Breezing through the remains of the top ten singles, The Mountain Goats, Starcrawler, and Vampire Weekend all have tunes tied at #7. Then it closes out with a tie at #10 between two bands who are not from where you’d think based on their names – Fontaines D.C. and Winnetka Bowling League.

On the album chart, with two more songs freshly released from their forthcoming Father of The Bride, Vampire Weekend take the top spot once again (last time being when the first two tracks came out at the end of January). Moving Panoramas have re-surged back to #2 with their In Two record, followed by Indoor Pets‘ just-delivered debut, Be Content, at #3. The aforementioned Fontaines D.C. appear for the first time on the album chart with their forthcoming Dogrel, tying Sego‘s upcoming Sego Sucks for #4. Again I’ll just name-drop to get through the rest of the top ten as we have albums from Cage The Elephant, Ex Hex, Foals, Sasami, and Wallows filling out #’s 6-10 (with a couple ties in there). Get the detailed version on the charts below.

Have a great SXSW if you’re there, maybe watch some live-streams if you’re not. I’ll catch you back here when it’s all said and done next Wednesday.

~ Josh Landow
Twitter: @JoshTLandow
 

Updated 3/13/19

#ArtistTrackLabel
1THE GET UP KIDSSATELLITEPOLYVINYL
2THE NATIONALYOU HAD YOUR SOUL WITH YOU4AD
3THE BLACK KEYSLO/HINONESUCH
4ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVERIN THE CAPITALSUB POP
5MEG MYERSRUNNING UP THAT HILL300 ENT.
6HATCHIEWITHOUT A BLUSHDOUBLE DOUBLE WHAMMY
7tTHE MOUNTAIN GOATSCADAVER SNIFFING DOGMERGE
 STARCRAWLERSHE GETS AROUNDROUGH TRADE
 VAMPIRE WEEKENDSUNFLOWERCOLUMBIA
10tFONTAINES D.C.BIGPARTISAN
 WINNETKA BOWLING LEAGUEKOMBUCHARCA
12tCAGE THE ELEPHANTHOUSE OF GLASSRCA
 MAC DEMARCONOBODYSELF-RELEASED
 RUN RIVER NORTHHANDS UPNETTWERK
15tCALPURNIACELLROYAL MOUNTAIN
 THE INTERRUPTERSGAVE YOU EVERYTHINGEPITAPH
 K. FLAYBAD VIBESINTERSCOPE
 SOAKDÉJÀ VUROUGH TRADE
19tJOHNNY MARRARMATOPIANEW VOODOO
 TACOCATGRAINS OF SALTSUB POP
 WALLOWS [FT. CLAIRO]ARE YOU BORED YET?ATLANTIC
22tBAD RELIGIONCHAOS FROM WITHINEPITAPH
 EX HEXRAINBOW SHINERMERGE
 INDOOR PETSGOOD ENOUGHWICHITA
 LOCAL NATIVESWHEN AM I GONNA LOSE YOULOMA VISTA / CONCORD
 SQUIDHOUSEPLANTSPRACTISE
 WALKER LUKENSHEARD YOU BOUGHT A HOUSEMODERN OUTSIDER

 

Updated 3/13/19

#ArtistAlbumLabel
1VAMPIRE WEEKENDFATHER OF THE BRIDECOLUMBIA
2MOVING PANORAMASIN TWOMODERN OUTSIDER
3INDOOR PETSBE CONTENTWICHITA
4tFONTAINES D.C.DOGRELPARTISAN
 SEGOSEGO SUCKSROLL CALL
6tCAGE THE ELEPHANTSOCIAL CUESRCA
 EX HEXIT’S REALMERGE
8SASAMISASAMIDOMINO
9tFOALSEVERYTHING NOT SAVED WILL BE LOST – PART 1WARNER BROS.
 WALLOWSNOTHING HAPPENSATLANTIC
11tLOCAL NATIVESVIOLET STREETLOMA VISTA / CONCORD
 WEYES BLOODTITANTIC RISINGSUB POP
13tMANICSBINARY EPDIM MAK
 MAPSCOLOURS. REFLECT. TIME. LOSS.MUTE
 STEPHEN MALKMUSGROOVE DENIEDMATADOR
16tKAREN O & DANGER MOUSELUX PRIMABMG
 TEENGOOD FRUITCARPARK
 WILD BELLEEVERYBODY ONE OF A KINDLOVE TONE
19DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONSAMERICAN LOVE CALLDEAD OCEANS
20tANDREW BIRDMY FINEST WORK YETLOMA VISTA
 BAD SUNSMYSTIC TRUTHEPITAPH
 BETTER OBLIVION COMMUNITY CENTERBETTER OBLIVION COMMUNITY CENTERDEAD OCEANS
 LAMBCHOPTHIS (IS WHAT I WANTED TO TELL YOU)MERGE
 NICK WATERHOUSENICK WATERHOUSEINNOVATIVE LEISURE
 PERFECT SONCASTSUB POP
 PONDTASMANIAINTERSCOPE
 RY XUNFURLBMG
 SHARON VAN ETTENREMIND ME TOMORROWJAGJAGUWAR

 

SubModern Session: Miya Folick

Miya Folick
Premonitions
(Terrible / Interscope)

A couple years ago I started to hear about Miya Folick so when she was opening for one of my faves, Kate Nash, last year, I made it a point to arrive early for her set. Having impressed me with the energy of her live performance, I was ready for Miya’s eclectic full-length debut Premonitions some months later. A bit after its release, Miya and her bandmate Josh Menashe (guitar / keyboard) joined us to chat and perform acoustic versions of songs from the record for another SubModern Session, which you can listen to below.

FMQB:  Before Premonitions, you had some EPs out and you’ve stated that some of your fans might be surprised by what they hear on the album. 
 
Miya Folick:  Honestly, I expected people to be more surprised than I think they are. [laughs] I think a lot of music journalists, when talking to me, a common question is "Oh, it’s a lot different than your EPs." I kind of expected listeners to do the same, but they didn’t. But also I think a lot more people have listened to this album than any of the EPs, so a lot of them are new listeners and they don’t know to be surprised.  People have been surprisingly unconcerned by this genre-bouncing, but I think if you’ve listened to me, it’s anticipated, knowing my old work.

FMQB:  Genre-bouncing is a good thing! I’ll admit that I hadn’t heard the EPs, but I saw you live earlier this year, so going into the album, that was my basis for comparison. It was a pretty rockin’ live show so maybe I was a little surprised that there’s a lot of pop sounds on the album.

Miya:  On that tour, we’d already started playing some of the album, but the songs weren’t entirely finished, so we were playing kind of different arrangements of them. And even now, when you see it live, it’s a different experience. It’s not like listening to the album, which some people do, which is fine, but I think it’s a little bit more exciting when the live show is a tiny bit different. Mostly it’s more guitars and more live drums. 

FMQB:  Is your full band on the recording or is it fewer people?

Miya:  Yeah, the album was me and [producers] Justin Raisen, Yves Rothman, Luke Niccoli. That was like the core team. And then we did sessions with studio musicians and we ended up playing a lot of it ourselves. We didn’t do any real, like live band recording, as I did on the first two EPs, which are with this band that I tour with. The album is more produced.

FMQB: And is this band that you tour with now, the same band that you recruited on Tinder

Miya:  Yes! Yeah!

FMQB:  That really worked out! That could’ve been very dicey!

Miya:  I feel like it’s the modern, like posting a flier on the wall at your local rehearsal space. Everybody’s on Tinder, or at least they were. I feel now it’s kind of died down. But when I met them three years ago, I was having trouble finding a band in real life, so I was just like, all musicians are on Tinder so I should just make a Tinder profile that says I’m looking for a band. And it worked out!

FMQB:  That’s good!

Miya:  We’re actually going on tour in February with the band Barrie from New York, and I think they actually found their bass player on Tinder as well, which I think is funny.
 
FMQB:  I want to talk about your voice a little bit. You have a great voice, you have a great range. When you write songs, are you writing to your own vocal strengths, or do you just write the words and then figure out how you’re gonna sing them later?

Miya: I write to my vocal strength, only in that I write by singing. I don’t write things down, and I don’t really write lyrics before melody ever. For instance, "Thingamajig," that started by Justin playing those chords on a Rhodes and we looped it, and I got up on the mic, and just… Basically I write like a rapper. If you think of how rap sessions go, you make a track and then the rapper gets up there and just spits things out for five minutes to an hour, depending on how long it takes to get to the song. That’s how I do it too. I just sing until there’s a song. And sometimes if I have a lot of different melodic and lyrical ideas, but I can’t figure out what the song is about , then I’ll pause, and we would all listen back to the recording and pick out what we liked to make a collage of song and figure out what it’s about. Then I’d go back and really solidify the lyrics.

FMQB:  You’ve used the phrase domestic pop about some of these songs, in taking everyday moments, like a lyric that stuck out to me was about painting your toes and eating Cheerios. So taking those everyday moments and making them into bigger songs.
 
Miya: Yeah, I think that the things that I find most beautiful are rarely the most spectacular. So one of the intentions going into the album was to make something that felt spectacular, but that was about mundane, everyday things. Because that’s what makes up our lives. If you can’t find the beauty in that, then you’re just waiting around for the better life to come, but this is it. This is the one. [laughs]

Find out more about Miya Folick at MiyaFolick.com or TerribleRecords.com and catch her on a headlining U.S. tour in February and March.  Listen to her acoustic SubModern Session performances of "Freak Out," "Thingamajig," and "What We’ve Made" here.

By Josh T. Landow

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

IN THE RING WITH KATE NASH

By Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio

British singer-songwriter Kate Nash made a splash back in 2007 with her debut album Made of Bricks, showcasing her sharp songwriting and witty lyrics. Since then, her sound has expanded and gotten more eclectic over the course of the past decade. The past year has seen her profile skyrocket, as she used Kickstarter to fund the release of her fourth album Yesterday Was Forever while also co-starring on the smash Netflix series GLOW. Recently, Kate sat down with Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio of FMQB to discuss her new record, feminism, mental health and pro wrestling.

 

How was your experience of working with Kickstarter?
I feel like it still is the experience because it’s still figuring it out as you go along. It was nerve-wracking doing the Kickstarter. I didn’t want to do it at first because I thought it might fail and I was nervous the entire time. But I was also pretty excited. The more time went on, I realized it made more sense for me to be doing that. I had terrible meetings with record labels that made me feel like crap.

You already had three albums out through bigger labels and that helped you build enough of a fan base that when you go off on your own with something like Kickstarter, they’ll follow you.
It was so stressful. You have to brace yourself for failure or you have to change how you measure success. It’s really easy to feel like “I’m falling because everything’s hard” or “Should it be easier? Should I keep going because it’s so hard?” But actually, we’re having amazing experiences on tour that are a constant reminder.

I met a girl the other night who was crying through “Nicest Thing,” so much so that Emma in my band wanted to run down and hug her during the show. We met her afterward and she said her and her sister had listened to my music together and they’d always talked about going to a show. Her sister died, and that was her sister’s favorite song. And she was from Alaska and we were in Denver, and her grandparents lived in Denver, so she decided it was a sign and came to the show on her own. That is so amazing and that’s how I want to measure success – just having a connection with people through music.

You can’t take it for granted. It’s easy to get caught up in that fast-paced lifestyle and what boxes you need to tick, but I’ll remember that for the rest of my life. When I look back on Made of Bricks and being on the charts and played on the radio, that’s not something I look back on and think, “Oh it was so moving being played on Radio 1, wow.” It was fine but I wasn’t happy then and I’m happier now as an artist and I still get to have these amazing, emotional moments with fans.

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