Hope you all got your taxes done with big refunds coming your way. As if that ever happens. Well, at least, here’s hoping you didn’t owe too much to stop you from picking up some Record Store Day goodies. Anyway, here we are with another edition of the SubModern Report, sandwiched between Coachella weekends. (Anyone go or going?) Before we begin, there’s some unfortunate news to report. Due to a format change at WBOS / Boston, the Arriving At Alternative show no longer exists, and thus is off of our charts. We’ll see who’s gonna pick up the slack in Beantown.

For the third week in a row now, we have the same band topping both the albums and singles charts. This time it’s Yeasayer with their upcoming fifth record Erotic Reruns and one of the singles released from it thus far, "Let Me Listen In On You." I’ll put a slight asterisk on that however. *The total spins of Tame Impala‘s two new singles, "Patience" and "Borderline" (#5t) would place them higher than Yeasayer if their new album, which these singles will presumably be on, was announced. But it’s not, so it is what it is.

Last week’s double #1, The Get Up Kids are tied at #2 on the singles chart with Morrissey‘s cover of "Wedding Bell Blues" and a brand new tune from Silversun Pickups, "It Doesn’t Matter Why." There’s another three-way tie at #5 between Courtney Barnett‘s "Everybody Here Hates You," Fontaines D.C.‘s "Boys In The Better Land," and Kevin Parker‘s already mentioned band. Middle Kids then stand alone at #8 with "Real Thing," before a six-way tie for #9 that includes Cage The Elephant, amongst others.

Several of those artists just mentioned also show up in the top ten albums, including Fontaines D.C., whose Dogrel is tied for #2 with Broken Social Scene‘s Let’s Try The After. The Get Up Kids’ and Cage’s albums are also tied with each other at #4. Oddly it’s the bottom half of the top ten that’s without ties this time out. Vampire Weekend‘s Father of The Bride is #6, Karen O & Danger Mouse‘s Lux Prima is #7, Pure Bathing Culture‘s Night Pass is #8, Tacocat‘s This Mess Is A Place is #9, and The National‘s I Am Easy To Find is #10.

Of course you’ll find all that and more laid out properly on the charts below. That shall do it until next week my friends. Keep spinning the future hits!

~ Josh Landow
Twitter: @JoshTLandow
 

Updated 4/17/19

#ArtistTrackLabel
1YEASAYERLET ME LISTEN IN ON YOUSELF-RELEASED
2tTHE GET UP KIDSTHE PROBLEM IS ME POLYVINYL
 MORRISSEYWEDDING BELL BLUESETIENNE / BMG
 SILVERSUN PICKUPSIT DOESN’T MATTER WHYNEW MACHINE / Q PRIME
5tCOURTNEY BARNETTEVERYBODY HERE HATES YOUMOM + POP
 FONTAINES D.C.BOYS IN THE BETTER LANDPARTISAN
 TAME IMPALABORDERLINEINTERSCOPE
8MIDDLE KIDSREAL THINGDOMINO
9tCAGE THE ELEPHANT [FT. BECK]NIGHT RUNNINGRCA
 FOREIGN AIREVERYTHING IS GOOD NOWSELF-RELEASED
 HOT CHIPHUNGRY CHILDDOMINO
 J. MASCISDON’T DO ME LIKE THATSUB POP
 MISSIOI SEE YOURCA
 TITUS ANDRONICUS(I BLAME) SOCIETYMERGE
15MODEST MOUSEPOISON THE WELLEPIC
16tAMYL & SNIFFERSGOT YOUATO
 STARCRAWLERPET SEMATARYROUGH TRADE
18tRA RA RIOTBAD TO WORSEROB THE RICH / CAROLINE
 TACOCATHOLOGRAMSUB POP
20tBROKEN SOCIAL SCENECAN’T FIND MY HEARTARTS & CRAFTS
 TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUBTALKGLASSNOTE
 VAMPIRE WEEKENDTHIS LIFECOLUMBIA
23tDR. JOETELL YOUR MOTHERDOUBLEMONO
 KAREN O & DANGER MOUSETURN THE LIGHTBMG
25tALASKALASKAMOONMARATHON
 INTERPOLTHE WEEKENDMATADOR
 PIP BLOMRUBYHEAVENLY / PIAS

 

Updated 4/17/19

#ArtistAlbumLabel
1YEASAYEREROTIC RERUNSSELF-RELEASED
2tBROKEN SOCIAL SCENELET’S TRY THE AFTER (VOL. 1 & 2)ARTS & CRAFTS
 FONTAINES D.C.DOGRELPARTISAN
4tCAGE THE ELEPHANTSOCIAL CUESRCA
 THE GET UP KIDSPROBLEMSPOLYVINYL
6VAMPIRE WEEKENDFATHER OF THE BRIDECOLUMBIA
7KAREN O & DANGER MOUSELUX PRIMABMG
8PURE BATHING CULTURENIGHT PASSINFINITE COMPANION
9TACOCATTHIS MESS IS A PLACESUB POP
10THE NATIONALI AM EASY TO FIND4AD
11EX HEXIT’S REALMERGE
12tAGES AND AGESME YOU THEY WESELF-RELEASED
 THE DRUMSBRUTALISMANTI-
 GRIZRIDE WAVESINGROOVES
 GUIDED BY VOICESWARP AND WOOFSELF-RELEASED
 MAC DEMARCOHERE COMES THE COWBOYSELF-RELEASED
 SEBADOHACT SURPRISEDDANGERBIRD
 SEGOSEGO SUCKSROLL CALL
 WEYES BLOODTITANTIC RISINGSUB POP
20tBAND OF SKULLSLOVE IS ALL YOU LOVESO
 CHARLY BLISSYOUNG ENOUGHBARSUK
 FOALSEVERYTHING NOT SAVED WILL BE LOST – PART 1WARNER BROS.
 HATCHIEKEEPSAKEDOUBLE DOUBLE WHAMMY
 SLOTHRUSTTHE PACTDANGERBIRD
25tALDOUS HARDINGDESIGNER4AD
 BAD SUNSMYSTIC TRUTHEPITAPH
 BILLIE EILISHWHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?INTERSCOPE
 THE COATHANGERSTHE DEVIL YOU KNOWSUICIDE SQUEEZE
 GIUDAE.V.A.BURGER
 MOVING PANORAMASIN TWOMODERN OUTSIDER
 RADICAL FACETHERAPYBEAR MACHINE
 ROMAN LEWISHEARTBREAK (FOR NOW)BRIGHT ANTENNA
 SHOVELS AND ROPEBY BLOODDUALTONE
 WALLOWSNOTHING HAPPENSATLANTIC
 WILD BELLEEVERYBODY ONE OF A KINDLOVE TONE

 

SubModern Session: Dentist

Dentist
Night Swimming
(Cleopatra)

Dentist is a three-piece indie pop / surf rock band from Asbury Park, New Jersey featuring the married couple of singer / bass player Emily Bornemann and guitarist Justin Bornemann, along with drummer Matt Hockenjos.  The trio released their third album Night Swimming last year on Cleopatra Records.  I recently got to know them a bit and you can too in the interview below and hear them perform acoustic versions of songs from their album for our latest SubModern Session in the player below.

FMQB:  Tell us how Dentist got together? 
 
Emily Bornemann:  Justin and I formed this band when we were in another band that was fading out.  So we started Dentist as a side project, mostly just for fun.  We put out a few songs and people liked them, so we were like, "alright, let’s do it full time."  We were a five-piece, and then a four-piece, and now we’re a three-piece with Matt on drums for the past couple years. 

FMQB:  So it’s been addition by subtraction?

Justin Bornemann:  Yeah, we started with as many as possible.  We’ll be down to two soon.  [laughs]

FMQB:  I know that Emily and Justin, you’re married.  Did that precede the band?

JB:  Yes.  Well, we got married while the band was happening, but we were together before that.

EB:  We were engaged when the band started.

FMQB: I imagine it would be a great thing to be working with your significant other all the time, but then also there are probably times when it can be difficult.  What’s the dynamic like and how do you separate what’s the band, and what’s personal life? 
 
EB:  Since the day we met, we were playing music together, and we weren’t even dating then.  So we don’t really know any other way of life as a couple.  Basically, we really just don’t take anything home.  Everything stays in Matt’s room where we practice.  [laughs]

Matt Hockenjos:  There’s a lot in there!  [laughs]

JB:  That’s in theory what we try to do, but…

FMQB:  And Matt is also a marriage counselor?

MH:  I have to say they really don’t take a lot home.  They get along great.  I think being a three-piece band makes it pretty easy as well to communicate.  Musically, just from my perspective, I think they’re on a pretty similar page.  They like a lot of the same music and they hear things similarly.  I notice that when Justin’s maybe having trouble thinking of where a song should go, Emily can kind of pick up there and say, "what about this."  And vice versa.  If Emily has an idea for a song and we don’t know how to get to the next part, Justin’s great at taking it to that next level as well.  As far as music couples go, they’re awesome and they’re great to work with.   
 
EB:  Awww, thanks Matt!

FMQB:  It sounds like there’s less of delineation than like, Emily writes the words and Justin writes the music.  It’s more of an overall collaborative effort.
 
EB: Yeah, pretty much.  I mostly write the words.  Mostly.  But everything else is like 50/50.

FMQB:  A third album can be a defining moment for a band, cause you’ve had a couple under your belt.  What was the significance of album three for you?
 
EB: The third record was the most thought out.  The first one we kinda just threw together everything we had.   

FMQB:  That’s usually how a first record is.
 
EB: Yeah.  Then the second record was a little more coherent.  But I feel like with the third one, we grew up a little. 

JB:  It was more thought out, but also done in a very short amount of time too.
 
FMQB: Being from Asbury Park, the home of Bruce Springsteen, there’s definitely a musical heritage from your town.  So, do you get asked about having a connection with him all the time?

JB: Very frequently.  If we do an interview out of the area it comes up a lot.

FMQB: And it just did again, so… [laughs]  Do you have a fondness [for Bruce] or do you just happen to be from the same town?

EB: I have a lot of respect for him.  Without him, Asbury would’ve died.  Now there’s a resurgence and they’re building everything up.  But during that period where Asbury wasn’t doing so well, there was still music.  That’s what started drawing people back in.   

JB:  He definitely put the name on the map.  Everybody knows Bruce Springsteen and Asbury Park.  We all respect him a lot, but none of us actually listen to his music, aside from songs here and there.  I was really curious about him though and I did actually read his book that came out last year.  He’s a really interesting guy, very interesting story.

FMQB: The other thing that I really wanted to know is why your band is called Dentist, which has a negative connotation to most people.  No one likes to go to the dentist.  Why did you name your band Dentist?

EB: It was funny.   

JB:  When we weren’t taking the band that seriously and it was just a side project, we really didn’t put any thought into it and we just thought it was funny.  I don’t know why.  It’s not that funny.  We weren’t thinking about how it would be when people search for our name on Google and stuff like that.  So, that’s how we got stuck with this name. 

EB: Yeah, stuck with is the way to put it.

Find out more about Dentist at DentistBand.com.  Listen to their acoustic SubModern Session performances of songs from Night Swimming here.

By Josh T. Landow

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

IN THE RING WITH KATE NASH

By Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio

British singer-songwriter Kate Nash made a splash back in 2007 with her debut album Made of Bricks, showcasing her sharp songwriting and witty lyrics. Since then, her sound has expanded and gotten more eclectic over the course of the past decade. The past year has seen her profile skyrocket, as she used Kickstarter to fund the release of her fourth album Yesterday Was Forever while also co-starring on the smash Netflix series GLOW. Recently, Kate sat down with Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio of FMQB to discuss her new record, feminism, mental health and pro wrestling.

 

How was your experience of working with Kickstarter?
I feel like it still is the experience because it’s still figuring it out as you go along. It was nerve-wracking doing the Kickstarter. I didn’t want to do it at first because I thought it might fail and I was nervous the entire time. But I was also pretty excited. The more time went on, I realized it made more sense for me to be doing that. I had terrible meetings with record labels that made me feel like crap.

You already had three albums out through bigger labels and that helped you build enough of a fan base that when you go off on your own with something like Kickstarter, they’ll follow you.
It was so stressful. You have to brace yourself for failure or you have to change how you measure success. It’s really easy to feel like “I’m falling because everything’s hard” or “Should it be easier? Should I keep going because it’s so hard?” But actually, we’re having amazing experiences on tour that are a constant reminder.

I met a girl the other night who was crying through “Nicest Thing,” so much so that Emma in my band wanted to run down and hug her during the show. We met her afterward and she said her and her sister had listened to my music together and they’d always talked about going to a show. Her sister died, and that was her sister’s favorite song. And she was from Alaska and we were in Denver, and her grandparents lived in Denver, so she decided it was a sign and came to the show on her own. That is so amazing and that’s how I want to measure success – just having a connection with people through music.

You can’t take it for granted. It’s easy to get caught up in that fast-paced lifestyle and what boxes you need to tick, but I’ll remember that for the rest of my life. When I look back on Made of Bricks and being on the charts and played on the radio, that’s not something I look back on and think, “Oh it was so moving being played on Radio 1, wow.” It was fine but I wasn’t happy then and I’m happier now as an artist and I still get to have these amazing, emotional moments with fans.

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