We’re counting down to the end of summer here at The SubModern Report. Are you all ready to go back to school? The good part of summer winding down though, is all the great new music that comes in the fall! But we still have some time left, so let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

This week we have a brand new single debuting at #1, from the daughter of that guy who’s always makin’ copies – Elle King is back with "Shame," ahead of her sophomore album coming later this year (probably in the fall). There’s a tie for #1 on the album chart with Interpol‘s Marauder holding on to the top spot, while also sharing it with the new Underworld and Iggy Pop EP, Teatime Dub Encounters. Last week Interpol’s new single, "Number 10," also shared a #1 ranking with "Back Down" from Bob Moses. Both have lost a bit of ground this week with the former tied at #4 and the latter at #2.

The Kooks are up to #3 with "Four Leaf Clover" (skipping right over the number in the song title), while Alkaline Trio‘s "Blackbird" and Jade Bird‘s "Uh Huh" are also in the aforementioned tie at #4 (put a bird on it). The Goon Sax and Slaves are tied at #7 with their singles "Make Time 4 Love" and "Chokehold," while their albums, We’re Not Talking and Acts of Fear and Love, are also tied, along with several others, at #4 (more on that in a bit). The top ten singles close out with five way tie for #9, which you can check out on the chart itself.

On the album chart, we see Alkaline Trio again, and appropriately, at #3 with the soon-to-be-released Is This Thing Cursed?, and then a five way tie that we touched upon earlier at #4. The unmentioned participants there are Death Cab For Cutie‘s Thank You For Today, Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever‘s Hope Downs, and Yoke Lore‘s Absolutes EP. The top ten albums also close with a tie, which I’ll once again leave to you to check out, along with the top 25 albums and singles, on the charts below.

If you missed it last week, be sure to check out the latest SubModern Session with The Beths, included once again with this week’s report because it was such a dang good one. That’s all I’ve got today. Catch you all again next time.

~ Josh Landow
Twitter: @JoshTLandow
 

Updated 8/15/18

#ArtistTrackLabel
1ELLE KINGSHAMERCA
2BOB MOSESBACK DOWNDOMINO
3THE KOOKSFOUR LEAF CLOVER AWAL
4tALKALINE TRIOBLACKBIRDEPITAPH
 INTERPOLNUMBER 10MATADOR
 JADE BIRDUH HUHGLASSNOTE
7tTHE GOON SAXMAKE TIME 4 LOVEWICHITA
 SLAVESCHOKEHOLDVIRGIN EMI
9tCASTLECOMERALL OF THE NOISECONCORD
 THE CRYSTAL METHODTHERE’S A DIFFERENCECO5
 JEFF THE BROTHERHOODCAMEL SWALLOWED WHOLEDINE ALONE
 MIKE SHINODA (FT. K.FLAY)MAKE IT UP AS I GOWARNER BROS.
 YOKE LORERIDEBIG INDIE / INGROOVES
14tANNA CALVIHUNTERDOMINO
 HOTEL MIRA3AM LULLABYLIGHT ORGAN
 SLOTHRUSTDOUBLE DOWNDANGERBIRD
17tBILLIE EILISHYOU SHOULD SEE ME IN A CROWNINTERSCOPE
 JUSTICESTOPCAROLINE
 METRICDARK SATURDAYMMI / BMG RIGHTS
 THIRD EYE BLIND10MEGAFORCE
21tTHE DODOSFORUMPOLYVINYL
 THE REVIVALISTSALL MY FRIENDSLOMA VISTA / CONCORD
 REX ORANGE COUNTYLOVING IS EASYAWAL
 ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVERAN AIR CONDITIONED MANSUB POP
 WHARVESMAN YOU WANT ME TO BELENNOX GROOVE
 WHITE DENIMIT MIGHT GET DARKCITY SLANG
 WILD NOTHINGLETTING GOCAPTURED TRACKS

 

Updated 8/15/18

#ArtistAlbumLabel
1tINTERPOLMARAUDERMATADOR
 UNDERWORLD & IGGY POPTEATIME DUB ENCOUNTERSCAROLINE
3ALKALINE TRIOIS THIS THING CURSED?EPITAPH
4tDEATH CAB FOR CUTIETHANK YOU FOR TODAYATLANTIC
 THE GOON SAXWE’RE NOT TALKINGWICHITA
 ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVERHOPE DOWNSSUB POP
 SLAVESACTS OF FEAR AND LOVEVIRGIN EMI
 YOKE LOREABSOLUTES EPBIG INDIE / INGROOVES
9tANNA CALVIHUNTERDOMINO
 BEACH HOUSE7SUB POP
 TWENTY ONE PILOTSTRENCHFUELED BY RAMEN
12tSLOTHRUSTTHE PACTDANGERBIRD
 WILD NOTHINGINDIGOCAPTURED TRACKS
14tTHE BETHSFUTURE ME HATES MECARPARK
 METRICMETRIC (TBA)MMI / BMG RIGHTS
 THE PINK SLIPSTRIGGEROBEY
17tTHE HAPPY FITSCONCENTRATESELF-RELEASED
 SANTIGOLDI DON’T WANT: THE GOLD FIRE SESSIONSDOWNTOWN
 SWEARIN’FALL INTO THE SUNMERGE
20tJUNGLEFOR EVERXL
 THE MARCH DIVIDEANTICIPATION POPSSLOW START
 SPIDER BAGSSOMEDAY EVERYTHING WILL BE FINEMERGE
 TUNNGSONGS YOU MAKE AT NIGHTFULL TIME HOBBY
24tBIG RED MACHINEBIG RED MACHINEJAGJAGUWAR
 BODEGAENDLESS SCROLLWHAT’S YOUR RUPTURE?
 DEAF WISHLITHIUM ZIONSUB POP
 GORILLAZTHE NOW NOWWARNER BROS.
 THE INTERRUPTERSFIGHT THE GOOD FIGHTHELLCAT

 

SubModern Session: The Beths

The Beths
Future Me Hates Me
(Carpark)

The Beths are a four piece band from Auckland, New Zealand formed by high school friends Elizabeth Stokes and Jonathan Pearce, along with bassist Benjamin Sinclair and drummer Ivan Luketina-Johnston, while they studied jazz at the University of Auckland.  After an EP back in 2016, The Beths are set to release their full-length debut Future Me Hates Me on August 10th.  I recently got to chat with Liz and Jonathan (as well as touring members Katie and Chris) as they began their first ever tour of the U.S.  They were kind enough to play a few songs for us as well for another SubModern Session, which you can listen to here.

FMQB:  Let me start by going on record as saying that "Future Me Hates Me" is my favorite song of the moment. 
 
Liz Stokes:  Thank you.

FMQB:  Let’s just talk about that song a bit.  It’s so clever, lyrically, and it’s super-catchy too.  It’s got all the pieces.  How did that idea come to you of your future self regretting decisions that your current self thinks are worth that future disdain?

LS:  I don’t know.  I mean, mostly when I write, I write a bunch of stream of consciousness stuff down.  I must’ve just been feeling annoyed at how I was pretty adamantly trying not to fall into something new after being in a long relationship.  I was skeptical of my feelings.  [laughs]  So I wrote this song about, kind of, that.

FMQB:  Well I don’t know what happened with that, but the song really worked out.  Enough so, I guess, that you made it the title track of the record.

LS:  Yeah.  Naming stuff is really hard.  I found it to be difficult.  It took us a long time to name this band and I tried to think of another title for the record and couldn’t.  Then I was like, "Well, Michael Jackson called his albums by one of the songs."

FMQB:  Speaking of the band name, you, Liz, are Elizabeth and that’s where The Beths name comes from.

LS: Yeah, it’s just like the back end of my name and I like the tradition of being a "The" band.  It means you’re a band… usually.  You can kinda tell when you’ve got a "The," it’s usually a band, but not always. 
 
FMQB:  But it’s kind of funny that you don’t go by Beth, you go by Liz.

LS:  Yeah!  The Lizes was even harder to say.

FMQB:  That would not really work too well.  The Z and the S together.

LS:  Everywhere I go it becomes harder and harder.  In Germany I felt cruel making German people try to say The Beths.  I felt terrible.

FMQB:  Oh how do they say it?

LS:  Y’know like, "Ze Bess" kinda thing.
 
FMQB:  It kind of sounds like The Best!  You can take that as a compliment. 

LS: There are a lot of people who think that I’m on stage saying, "Hi, we’re The Best," which I’m not.  [laughs]  I mean, we’re okay.

FMQB:  You’ve gotta have that confidence.  So how did The Beths start, now that we have the origin of the name?
 
LS: I’ve known Jonathan and Ivan and Ben, who are our home team Beths, since high school.  Basically we used to play in high school bands.  It’s the same as when you start a band in any scene I think.  The Auckland scene is pretty small and you get to know everybody in it.  We all went to jazz school at the same time as well and started playing together because, y’know, you got to jazz school and then you’re like, "I wanna play rock music in only triad chords and power chords."  I did the trumpet at jazz school and I didn’t realize how important, to me, lyrics in music were.  I would listen to a lot of jazz music and my favorite were always the standards where I really liked the lyrics, like Cole Porter songs, and Irving Berlin, and that kind of thing.  They’re so succinct and really witty.  And they’ve always got like a little, not punchline, but a little moment at the end of the song and that’ll be the title.  The whole concept and idea of the song will be compressed into the title, which is also the last line in the song or something like that.  I think I just missed writing lyrics and wanted to write songs in that kind of way.

FMQB:  What you just said is exactly what you did in "Future Me Hates Me." 
 
LS: YES!

FMQB:  Yes!  You did it!  You summed it up in that one phrase and it’s at the end of the song.  And you said you had written lyrics previously?
 
LS: Yeah.  My high school band was a folk band, so I’d written songs for that.  It was guitar based and three of us all singing, so that’s where I got a really good taste for vocal arranging.  Cause it was just, I would play the chords, our bass player would play double bass, and then it was all just vocal arrangements to fill out different sections or to make it interesting.  That’s something that came pretty naturally to me and that I really enjoy.

FMQB:  We’ve got some sweet harmonies today, which I really noticed even more so in this arrangement.
 
LS: Sorry, I make it very difficult for everybody.  [laughs]  Here, so play this stuff and sing at the same time.  It’ll be fine.  [laughs]

Jonathan Pearce: Play it at an unusually fast tempo.

LS: Yeah, play it fast, play it loud, and then sing really sweetly.  That’s about it.

Find out more about The Beths at TheBeths.com.  Future Me Hates Me is out August 10th on Carpark Records and is impacting this week via Terrorbird.  Listen to their SubModern Session performances of the album’s title track as well as "Happy Unhappy" and a bonus song from their 2016 EP here.

By Josh T. Landow

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

Kate Nash (photo: Kate Bellm)

IN THE RING WITH KATE NASH

By Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio
 
British singer-songwriter Kate Nash made a splash back in 2007 with her debut album Made of Bricks, showcasing her sharp songwriting and witty lyrics. Since then, her sound has expanded and gotten more eclectic over the course of the past decade. The past year has seen her profile skyrocket, as she used Kickstarter to fund the release of her fourth album Yesterday Was Forever while also co-starring on the smash Netflix series GLOW. Recently, Kate sat down with Josh T. Landow & Joey Odorisio of FMQB to discuss her new record, feminism, mental health and pro wrestling.

 

How was your experience of working with Kickstarter?
I feel like it still is the experience because it’s still figuring it out as you go along. It was nerve-wracking doing the Kickstarter. I didn’t want to do it at first because I thought it might fail and I was nervous the entire time. But I was also pretty excited. The more time went on, I realized it made more sense for me to be doing that. I had terrible meetings with record labels that made me feel like crap.

You already had three albums out through bigger labels and that helped you build enough of a fan base that when you go off on your own with something like Kickstarter, they’ll follow you.
It was so stressful. You have to brace yourself for failure or you have to change how you measure success. It’s really easy to feel like “I’m falling because everything’s hard” or “Should it be easier? Should I keep going because it’s so hard?” But actually, we’re having amazing experiences on tour that are a constant reminder.

I met a girl the other night who was crying through “Nicest Thing,” so much so that Emma in my band wanted to run down and hug her during the show. We met her afterward and she said her and her sister had listened to my music together and they’d always talked about going to a show. Her sister died, and that was her sister’s favorite song. And she was from Alaska and we were in Denver, and her grandparents lived in Denver, so she decided it was a sign and came to the show on her own. That is so amazing and that’s how I want to measure success – just having a connection with people through music.

You can’t take it for granted. It’s easy to get caught up in that fast-paced lifestyle and what boxes you need to tick, but I’ll remember that for the rest of my life. When I look back on Made of Bricks and being on the charts and played on the radio, that’s not something I look back on and think, “Oh it was so moving being played on Radio 1, wow.” It was fine but I wasn’t happy then and I’m happier now as an artist and I still get to have these amazing, emotional moments with fans.

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